On Making Oral Histories More Accessible to Persons with Hearing Loss

This essay recommends a series of steps that can be taken to make oral histories more accessible to persons who have hearing loss. Recommendations are offered for those who record oral history interviews and also for those who disseminate them. These recommendations are intended to mitigate some of the limitations on speech understanding that are experienced daily by the millions of people in the United States who have a hearing loss.

Procedures of Audio Recorded Interviews At COLUMBIA CENTER FOR ORAL HISTORY

Our usual procedure, once a project has been organized and funded, is to bring on staff an interviewer either as a consultant or as a part-time employee, to research and conduct the interviews. In recruiting interviewers we seek applicants who have knowledge of the field under investigation and interviewing experience. In particular, we search for someone familiar with the secondary literature, the location and organization of collections of written documents relevant to the interviews, a sense of the historiographical issues involved in the project, and the personality traits of an informed, interested listener.

Tips on Archiving Family History, Part 2

Readers sent dozens of questions about archiving and preserving family history and stories to Bertram Lyons, an archivist at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress in Washington. He was recently asked to be the editor of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, an organization that aims to share best practices in the management of audiovisual materials internationally. He received his master’s degree in museum studies from the University of Kansas in 2009.

Principles for Oral History and Best Practices for Oral History

Oral history refers both to a method of recording and preserving oral testimony and to the product of that process. It begins with an audio or video recording of a first person account made by an interviewer with an interviewee (also referred to as narrator), both of whom have the conscious intention of creating a permanent record to contribute to an understanding of the past.

Tips on Archiving Family History, Part 1

Readers sent dozens of questions about archiving and preserving family history and stories to Bertram Lyons, an archivist at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress in Washington. He manages digital archives relating to folklife, including StoryCorps, which records and collects oral histories. In addition to academic workshops, he participates in public outreach, answering questions from people interested in preserving audio and visual material in analog and digital media, as well as related documents.

US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (6)

Army historians should use either standard cassette recorders or digital recorders when conducting interviews. Adherence to this policy will facilitate the transcription process and the exchange of interviews between Army historical offices. The use of proprietary software for digital recorders, as well as the use of microcassettes, is discouraged. The Center of Military History will transcribe only standard cassettes. Although most Army historians will want to use digital recorders, standard cassette recorders remain widely available, relatively inexpensive, and portable. If using a cassette recorder, be sure to:

US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (5)

The End-of-Tour Interview Program described in AR 870-5 consists of interviews with the principals of the Secretariat and Army Staff, MACOM commanders, commanders of Army specified commands and Army components of unified commands, commandants and deputy commandants of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) schools and of the Army Medical Department Center and School, corps and division commanders, and commanders of theater and corps support commands. The program is designed to collect the experiences of individuals in important positions and to ensure that the information is preserved and available to the Army.

US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (4)

After the interview the historian's task is that of product management: summarizing, transcribing, editing, publishing, and storing. The historian's job is not complete until the information contained in the interview is available and accessible to other historians.

US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (3)

Before arriving for the interview, the historian should double-check to make sure that he or she has all the necessary equipment and that it is functioning. Familiarity with equipment will avoid any embarrassing moments at the start of the interview.

US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (2)

Army historians conduct several types of interviews with names that reflect their focus and content: biographical (sometimes known as career interviews), subject, exit, end-of-tour and after-action. A biographical interview focuses on an individual's life or career.
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Book review: “Line of Blacksmiths”

Autobiographical memoirs of a young man from Dezful during the imposed war The "Line of Blacksmiths" uses a beautiful front cover which enjoys elegance and taste in its design; as the selected text on the back cover is proof of the authenticity and belief that shows the Iranian combatant proud and the real winner of the imposed war: "I went to get my gun. They were looking at me. Their crying and begging increased.

Excerpts from Memoirs of Abdullah Salehi

On the 28th of September 1980, in the back alleys of the Taleghani [Khorramshahr] neighborhood, we clashed with Iraqi artillery. Speed of action was important. If we reacted late, the rackets would hit us. Sometimes I lurked behind the alleys so that I could surprise the Iraqis. In one of these ambushes, I turned off the car so that they would not hear his voice. I was waiting for the head of the truck to be found across the street.

A Review of the Book "Ismail Nazr-Aftab"

Memoirs of a captive named Ismail Karimian Shaddel
When our gaze passes through the cheerful and smiling face of Ishmael among the white bouquet on a light blue background and stops on the back cover of the book, we empathize with him through these few sentences of the narrator in his journey: "I knew from the way the tires were moving that the car was moving on the asphalt road. I lost consciousness again. I woke up to vague sounds like the voices of women and children.
The Fourth Online Meeting of Iranian Oral History

Iranian Oral History beyond Borders – 4

Dr. Abolfazl Hasanabadi, Dr. Morteza Rasouli Pour, and Dr. Abolhasani participated in the fourth meeting out of the series of meetings on oral history in Iran held online on Saturday 11th of Dey 1400 (January 1, 2022) hosted by Mrs. Mosafa. In the meeting set up in the History Hallway of the Clubhouse, they talked about “Iranian Oral History beyond Borders”. In continuation of the meeting, the host asked Dr. Hasanabadi to sum up the discussion.