US ARMY GUIDE TO ORAL HISTORY (1)

The U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH) first developed a concept for an oral history handbook in the mid-1980s. Its objective was to provide Department of the Army (DA) oral history guidance for the growing number of historians tasked with conducting interviews. Since that time, Army historians, military and civilian, have conducted thousands of oral history interviews. Because of the increased importance of oral history in documenting the history of the U.S. Army-as exemplified by the efforts to capture the Army’s response to the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 and the ongoing operations in the Global War on Terrorism-the Center of Military History deemed the time was right to revise its guide to practicing oral history in order to disseminate lessons learned from this wealth of experience.

A Dialogical Relationship. An Approach to Oral History

The phrase oral history is a common abbreviation for what we might describe, more articulately, as the use of oral sources in history or the social sciences.(1) In its most elementary form, the oral narratives and testimony which constitute oral history are but an additional tool in the historian’s panoply of sources, and are therefore subject to the same critical scrutiny as all other sources, in order to ascertain their reliability and their usefulness.

What Is Oral History?

Making Sense of Oral History offers a place for students and teachers to begin working with oral history as historical evidence. Written by Linda Shopes, this guide presents an overview of oral history and ways historians use it, tips on questions to ask when reading or listening to oral history interviews, a sample interpretation of an interview, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding and using oral history online. Linda Shopes is a historian at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. She has worked on, consulted for, and written about oral history projects for more than twenty-five years. She is coeditor of The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History and is past president of the Oral History Association.

Oral History and Archives

Before starting we want to state a few caveats about what we will be talking about when we talk about oral history and archiving. First a warning: we will be talking within the perspective of archival practices as they have emerged in the United States. Therefore some of what we say has to be recognized as culturally and historically limited, and of course reflective of a real difference in resources, although given current spending policies in the United States this difference may not last long.

How to Organize and Conduct Oral History Interviews

Oral history interviewing is one more tool in the larger repertoire of methodologies used for research in history, anthropology, and folklore. Oral history collects information about the past from observers and participants in that past.

Transcribing, Editing and Processing Guidelines

Transcribing and editing an oral history interview is a matter of personal style, but there are some important guidelines for basic transcript production. Some oral historians instruct their transcribers to record the interview word for word, while others allow for greater latitude.

Oral History Project Guidelines

PUTTING TOGETHER AN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT: OVERALL GUIDELINES 1. Identify your narrator—who can tell interesting stories, who has lived through a unique time period, who can document an era for which little other information exists? Make sure this person is in reasonable health for their age, with a good memory and has, preferably, an enjoyment of conversation. 2. Obtain consent—be sure the narrator understands why this interview is important and what your plans are once the interview is completed. Make the interview as professional as possible by scheduling an unhurried, private appointment with your narrator.
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Book review: “Line of Blacksmiths”

Autobiographical memoirs of a young man from Dezful during the imposed war The "Line of Blacksmiths" uses a beautiful front cover which enjoys elegance and taste in its design; as the selected text on the back cover is proof of the authenticity and belief that shows the Iranian combatant proud and the real winner of the imposed war: "I went to get my gun. They were looking at me. Their crying and begging increased.

Excerpts from Memoirs of Abdullah Salehi

On the 28th of September 1980, in the back alleys of the Taleghani [Khorramshahr] neighborhood, we clashed with Iraqi artillery. Speed of action was important. If we reacted late, the rackets would hit us. Sometimes I lurked behind the alleys so that I could surprise the Iraqis. In one of these ambushes, I turned off the car so that they would not hear his voice. I was waiting for the head of the truck to be found across the street.

A Review of the Book "Ismail Nazr-Aftab"

Memoirs of a captive named Ismail Karimian Shaddel
When our gaze passes through the cheerful and smiling face of Ishmael among the white bouquet on a light blue background and stops on the back cover of the book, we empathize with him through these few sentences of the narrator in his journey: "I knew from the way the tires were moving that the car was moving on the asphalt road. I lost consciousness again. I woke up to vague sounds like the voices of women and children.
The Fourth Online Meeting of Iranian Oral History

Iranian Oral History beyond Borders – 4

Dr. Abolfazl Hasanabadi, Dr. Morteza Rasouli Pour, and Dr. Abolhasani participated in the fourth meeting out of the series of meetings on oral history in Iran held online on Saturday 11th of Dey 1400 (January 1, 2022) hosted by Mrs. Mosafa. In the meeting set up in the History Hallway of the Clubhouse, they talked about “Iranian Oral History beyond Borders”. In continuation of the meeting, the host asked Dr. Hasanabadi to sum up the discussion.