Oral History Interview & Importance – Part 29

Transcription Control

Hamid Qazvini
Translated by Natalie Haghverdian

2017-11-14


One of the final steps in an interview is control of the audio and video file and its compatibility with the transcription. This step has to be conducted with outmost care since many users do not refer to the original file for various reasons and study the transcription. Hence, the transcription shall be precise and authentic.

The most important point is that in many cases the interviewer fails to detect faults in the transcription and fail to properly control it might result in irreparable consequences.

The following are most crucial in the control process.

  1. The individual conducting the control shall be literate to detect the content.
  2. Computer and relevant software literacy is essential.
  3. The transcription shall be controlled by an individual other than the interviewer and the transcriber.
  4. The controller shall precipitancy
  5. The controller shall keep the content safe and avoid unauthorized publication.
  6. Identification of vague or missing terms occur at this stage.
  7. The content prose shall be compatible to the literature of the narrator.
  8. The font shall remain unchanged.
  9. The controller is not to edit and include any literary modifications in the content.
  10. Control shall be based on the guidelines provided by the implementer.
  11. Punctuation shall be included for fluency; such as full stop (.), question mark (?), exclamation mark (!), comma (,), semicolon (;), colon (:), quotation mark (“”).
  12. The controller shall note any mistakes separately and hand them over to the relevant authority or the interviewer; the controller shall not modify the content to correct the narrator’s quote.
  13. The controller shall note additional questions or other remarks separately and hand them to the interviewer.
  14. Interview identification information control (previously notes) shall take place at this stage.

 

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 1 - Oral History, Path to Cultural Dialogue

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 2 - Characteristics of an Interviewer

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 3 - Selecting a Subject

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 4 - Narrator Identification & Selection

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 5 - Goal Setting

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 6 - Importance of Pre-interview Data Collection

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 7 - To Schedule & Coordinate an Interview

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 8 - Required Equipment & Accessories

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 9 - Presentation is vital

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 10 - Interview Room

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 11 - Pre-interview Justifications

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 12 - How to Start an Interview

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 13 - Proper Query

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 14 - Sample Query

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 15 - How to ask questions?

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 16 - Body Language

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 17 - Application of Body Language (1)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 18 - Application of Body Language (2)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 19 - Listening Carefully (1)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 20 - Listening Carefully (2)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 21 - New Questions

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 22 - Duration

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 23 - Arguments with the Narrator

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 24 - Mental Stimulation

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 25 - Ending the Interview

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 26 - Interview Report

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 27 - Additional Questions

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 28 - Transcription



 
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