Oral History Interview & Importance Part 21

New Questions

Hamid Qazvini
Translated by Natalie Haghverdian

2017-09-12


As discussed earlier, a list of interview questions around the main topic has to be prepared prior to the interview and the interviewer has to take it to the session.

Obviously, the questions shall not remain limited to the list and during the interview the interviewer shall come across new questions and issues for which he has to raise questions to achieve further elaboration and clarity. These questions are based on the narrator’s story and rise through careful detection of his speech. Also, by asking new questions and expressing points which further elaborate what the narrator has said the research will demonstrate interest into the story which will encourage the narrator to share more.

New questions rise based on the imagination and mental imagery and listening to the narrator. In fact, the interviewer puts themselves in the narrator’s shoes and reconstructs the situation in their mind when any given incident has occurred and makes efforts to identify any ambiguities and asks questions in order to complete the story and further elaborate the issue and stimulate the narrator’s mind.

Obviously, the range and diversity of such questions shall be subject to attention to the narrator’s story and the knowledge and competence of the interviewer on the subject and their mental imagery and power. 

The following have to be taken into consideration in raising such questions:

  1. All questions, even simple and small ones and any required elaboration to be noted to be asked in due time. There is no doubt that the smartest and strongest of memories fail to remember or suffer oblivion in dealing with diverse issues and far from reliable.
  2. Complementary questions shall be precise and within the boundaries of the topic under discussion and relevant to the order of stories share by the narrator. Any question or point which might disrupt the chain of narrator’s thoughts or divert the path of the interview shall be avoided.
  3. New questions and efforts to elaborate any ambiguities shall be through open questions. They help the narrator to express their ideas in full and complete and do not suffice to general or yes/no responses.
  4. Do not postpone new questions to the next session. Note that these questions shall be asked when the mind of the narrator is fully involved. In time, issues are forgotten or the narrator changes their mind towards the issue. By the end of the interview, take time to ask relevant questions.
  5. Considering that such question might come to mind in the midst of the discussion, design them into the shortest sentences possible to avoid diverting the narrator from the main topic.
  6. The questions shall not imply that the competence and knowledge of the interviewer is far beyond the narrator. Such feelings destroy trust and self-confidence and keeps the narrator from sharing more information.

 

 

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 1 - Oral History, Path to Cultural Dialogue

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 2 - Characteristics of an Interviewer

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 3 - Selecting a Subject

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 4 - Narrator Identification & Selection

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 5 - Goal Setting

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 6 - Importance of Pre-interview Data Collection

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 7 - To Schedule & Coordinate an Interview

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 8 - Required Equipment & Accessories

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 9 - Presentation is vital

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 10 - Interview Room

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 11 - Pre-interview Justifications

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 12 - How to Start an Interview

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 13 - Proper Query

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 14 - Sample Query

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 15 - How to ask questions?

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 16 - Body Languag

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 17 - Application of Body Language (1)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 18 - Application of Body Language (2)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 19 - Listening Carefully (1)

Oral History Interview & Importance Part 20 - Listening Carefully (2)



 
Number of Visits: 29


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Visiting the Head of Payam Publications in the 15th meeting of “Oral History of Book”

Memories of 54 years

According to the website of Iranian Oral History, the 15th meeting out of the second round of the meetings “Oral History of Book” organized by Nasrollah Haddadi researcher and the presenter of the show was held in the Institute of House of Book on Saturday 29th of July 2017. The show was attended by Mohammad Nik Dast, the Head of Payam Publications.
Oral History Interview & Importance Part 16

Body Language

Body language or non-verbal communication comprises a major part of our daily communication. This techniques is in times clearer and more effective than verbal communication and it is perceived to be a complementary component. This communication technique might be a reflection of any individuals emotional or physical status. Hence, it is important to know and apply it properly to promote our verbal and non-verbal communication skills in an interview.
14th Session of "Oral History of Book"

I Do Not Discount Much, Book Must Be Lord

According to the Oral History Website of Iran, the 14th session of the second term of "Oral History of Book" was the second meeting of conversation with Mohammad-Reza Jafari, director of Nashrenow Publication. This meeting, managed by Nasrallah Haddadi, writer and researcher, was held in the morning of Tuesday, July 25, 2017 in Khaneh Ketab Institution Saraye Ahle Ghalam.
Memoirs of Ashraf Baharlou from the injured in war

Living in Abadan, and relief working in Taleqani Hospital

Female relief workers played a major role in serving the injured in the hospitals of the city of Abadan. Far from their families and without any material expectation, they had stayed in a city which had been blockaded by the enemy to help the war combatants in order to nurse and take care of their injured brothers. Ashraf Baharlou is one of these young female relief workers during the eight-uear Iraqi imposed war against Islamic Republic of Iran. In an interview with the website of Iranian Oral History, she has talked about her memoirs from Abadan and Taleqani Hospital.